In 2016 40,450 women - moms, sisters, daughters, and friends - lost their lives to breast cancer. 

But it does not have to be this way. In 2017, over 316,120 people will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Over 95% of those diagnosed early will survive and thrive.  

The Brem Foundation needs YOU to bring us closer to a world where more moms, sisters, friends, daughters, and wives get to be with their families for long, healthy years. 

 

SURVIVAL CANNOT BE THE ONLY METRIC

The toll on a woman, her family, her caregivers, her employer, and the entire healthcare system is intensely different when she is diagnosed at early vs. later stage breast cancer. Even if she survives. That is why survival, alone, should not be the only metric for determining when and how to screen. "Intensity of care" cuts heavily in favor of every woman being properly screened at least every year after age 40. 

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BREAST CANCER GENES CAN BE PASSED FROM EITHER PARENT

Genetic mutations that increase a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer can be passed from her mother or her father.

THE #1 RISK FACTOR FOR BREAST CANCER IS BEING A WOMAN

A family history of breast cancer increases a woman’s risk of getting the disease, but most women diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer. 


A MAMMOGRAM IS JUST ONE OF MANY SCREENING OPTIONS

Other screening options—such as ultrasound, MRI, tomosynthesis, and molecular breast imaging—should be
utilized based on each woman’s risk factors.